Saturday, March 12, 2016

Dry Season in the Country



In tropical Yucatán, if there is a season that resembles autumn in the north, this is it. Late winter and spring on the Peninsula is the dry season. Rain is slight and the otherwise lush, nearly-impenetrable vegetation in natural areas gives way for a few hot, dry months. Herbs, grasses and other small plants wither to nothing and many bushes and trees drop their leaves.

Out at the ranch, the opening of spaces and the extra light reaching the ground offer me a chance to see things that are hard to discern at other times. The rest of the year, shade and thick green curtains of vines and brush block the view more than few feet beyond either side of the road and trails.

Since this is my first dry season on this land, I am using the time to take a close look around. I took an hour's hike on one of the trails to the back of the property last week. I was able peer into areas normally hidden from view, and observe the wider contours of the property. This helps me plan construction and irrigation projects that I will be working on later.

I've surveyed and opened access to a nice high spot that may prove to be my home site and cleared trash and rubble from around the existing house. I also have taken a good look at the old orchard to figure out where I can best plant fruit trees, keeping in mind gravity-fed irrigation from a central water storage tank next to the well.

The openness right now also allows me to appreciate other things close up, things I might miss in the rainy season. For instance, this chaká (gumbo limbo) tree, is not so easily noticed the rest of the year. I took a moment to admire its green trunk and contrasting papery copper-colored bark.


I also noticed this tiny fungus growing on a rotting, fallen branch.



The walk took me around a meandering loop that ended back at my work area, the former orchard near the corral and well. It looks very different right now, too, both due to the dry weather and our efforts to clear space for spring planting. I am starting to save stout hardwood branches for fence posts, a few of which which can be seen leaning against the wall. I am not sure when I'll need them, but certainly they will be useful at some point.

I also am saving longer sections for use as roof beams on a later project. I'll post about that soon.



Text and images copyright 2016 by Marc Olson

5 comments:

  1. It seems beautiul there! I love your take on life, and the simple beauties that are everywhere!

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  2. Good morning Marc. I have been on-the-go and so have you. The cap you left here during your last visit with Jorge and me, is still hanging on a hook in the hallway, patiently waiting for you to come get it... any time my friend. Whatever is going on in our busy lives, you are always welcome to stop by.

    I loved this post Marc, on so many levels. Cat Stevens said,

    "So on and on I go, the seconds tick the time out
    So much left to know, and I'm on the road to find out."

    That's what we do, isn't it? Hope to share some nice time with you soon.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I miss you, I hope you are well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am well. Just working hard and taking a break from blog. I will post again soon.

      Delete

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